In the case of a blackout, the power supply needs to be restored quickly. This is possible using emergency mobile transformers with specially developed equipment by PFISTERER. The units equipped with CONNEX are easy to transport and quickly ready for use.

Read more

Flexible, space-saving and even in-house: CONNEX opens up new opportunities in the field of connection technology. Take the compact Oerlikon substation in Switzerland, for example, which takes up just 30 percent of the space required in the past.

Read more

Is there such a thing as powerful overhead lines that also impress with design? Of course! The proof can be found in powerful compact lines, featuring an aesthetic, stylish design and equipped with advanced composite insulator strings by PFISTERER.

Read more

Off-shore wind farms have to withstand the most extreme conditions. CONNEX – the first cable system certified for off-shore use – connects transformers, switchgears, and converter stations in a safe and reliable manner, despite the salt, wind, and weather.

Read more

News

The SEANEX inner cone solution by PFISTERER is an offshore variant of the successful CONNEX HV connection system that is specially adapted for 66 kV inter-array cabling. The new offshore accessories combines all the proven performance features – salt water resistance, solid insulation, pluggable and touch-safe – yet it is much more compact, lighter in weight, and lower in cost.

More

Westnetz, one of Germany’s largest distribution network operators, is building a 17 km underground cable system in Hunsrück as part of their efforts to support the transition to renewable energy. This new high-voltage cable will transport renewable wind power from turbines at Hunsrück to the region's urban centres.

More
04.07. - 04.07.2019

Ormazabal Techniktagung

Rottweil, Germany

08.09. - 08.09.2019

Der Trafo im Fokus

Schönenwerd, Switzerland

17.09. - 19.09.2019

ENERGETAB

Bielsko-Biała, Poland

PFISTERER donates new insulators to Deutsches Museum for high-voltage Faraday cage attraction

LAPP Insulators, a member of the PFISTERER Group of companies, has equipped the famous Faraday cage at the Deutsches Museum in Munich with brand-new insulators. Among the first visitors after the refit were the television channel ZDF with the astrophysicist, presenter and university lecturer, Professor Harald Lesch.

Read more

Anyone who has been to the Deutsches Museum will be familiar with its high-voltage exhibit. The Faraday cage demonstration attracts around 200,000 visitors every year and is far and away the most popular demonstration at the Museum - an unforgettable experience for everyone who sees it. Bolts of lightning flash across the hall with a reverberating 'crack.' Three times daily, a member of the Museum staff climbs into the Faraday cage to prove that a metal cage can protect against electricity levels as high as 220,000 volts.

The high-voltage installation dates from the 1950s: the insulators of the Faraday cage had been in use for as long as 66 years, with the cage and museum employee hanging from them. The thousand-dollar question was: how long do such insulators actually last? An expert from the product testing service TÜV, who was to have assessed the installation recently, was unable to offer any conclusions on this point. Determined to exclude any risk, no matter how small, the Deutsches Museum experts therefore decided to replace the insulators. But where can you get hold of such specialised spare parts quickly? The Museum was naturally eager to avoid a long-term shutdown of its highlight.

Insulators sourced from Wunsiedel again - 66 years on

The original manufacturer of the insulators for the Faraday cage was Stemag, a company based in Wunsiedel, in Upper Franconia and a forerunner of the present-day LAPP Insulators GmbH. The company is still headquartered in Wunsiedel and retains its world-leading position as a manufacturer of insulators, just as it was all those years ago.

Once again, LAPP specialists produced the desired insulators and presented them to the Museum free of charge. "It's a real honour for us to be represented in the Deutsches Museum through our products," explains Jan Schulte-Fischedick, Head of Technical Consulting at LAPP Insulators. Deutsches Museum press spokesman Gerrit Faust adds, "We're absolutely thrilled to havethe highlight of our high-voltage installation up and running again."

Astrophysicist Harald Lesch in the Faraday cage

Incidentally, the refitted Faraday cage makes its first major TV appearance on ZDF at 7 p.m. on 7 October. On Harald Lesch's programme "Terra X - Fascination of the Universe, The Big Bang - Puzzle of the Beginning," the well-known astrophysicist, university lecturer and presenter will be getting into the cage himself.

Spectacular experiments in LAPP high-voltage laboratory

The high-voltage installation in the Deutsches Museum is a magnet for spectators, but Schulte-Fischedick refers to another highlight which is actually much older, though it still functions to the most modern standards. In Selb, near Wunsiedel, his company operates a high-voltage laboratory known as the Hochvolthaus. This started work in 1928 and still facilitates spectacular high-voltage experiments - though these are not open to the public. Both corona discharges (sometimes known as St. Elmo's fire) and brilliant brush discharges can be observed here. All this is on a slightly larger scale than the high-voltage installation at the Deutsches Museum: the laboratory can test at 1.3 million volts under dry conditions and in artificial rain, which the lightning generator can produce a massive 2.1 million volts.

PFISTERER donates new insulators to Deutsches Museum for high-voltage Faraday cage attraction

LAPP Insulators, a member of the PFISTERER Group of companies, has equipped the famous Faraday cage at the Deutsches Museum in Munich with brand-new insulators. Among the first visitors after the refit were the television channel ZDF with the astrophysicist, presenter and university lecturer, Professor Harald Lesch.

Read more

Anyone who has been to the Deutsches Museum will be familiar with its high-voltage exhibit. The Faraday cage demonstration attracts around 200,000 visitors every year and is far and away the most popular demonstration at the Museum - an unforgettable experience for everyone who sees it. Bolts of lightning flash across the hall with a reverberating 'crack.' Three times daily, a member of the Museum staff climbs into the Faraday cage to prove that a metal cage can protect against electricity levels as high as 220,000 volts.

The high-voltage installation dates from the 1950s: the insulators of the Faraday cage had been in use for as long as 66 years, with the cage and museum employee hanging from them. The thousand-dollar question was: how long do such insulators actually last? An expert from the product testing service TÜV, who was to have assessed the installation recently, was unable to offer any conclusions on this point. Determined to exclude any risk, no matter how small, the Deutsches Museum experts therefore decided to replace the insulators. But where can you get hold of such specialised spare parts quickly? The Museum was naturally eager to avoid a long-term shutdown of its highlight.

Insulators sourced from Wunsiedel again - 66 years on

The original manufacturer of the insulators for the Faraday cage was Stemag, a company based in Wunsiedel, in Upper Franconia and a forerunner of the present-day LAPP Insulators GmbH. The company is still headquartered in Wunsiedel and retains its world-leading position as a manufacturer of insulators, just as it was all those years ago.

Once again, LAPP specialists produced the desired insulators and presented them to the Museum free of charge. "It's a real honour for us to be represented in the Deutsches Museum through our products," explains Jan Schulte-Fischedick, Head of Technical Consulting at LAPP Insulators. Deutsches Museum press spokesman Gerrit Faust adds, "We're absolutely thrilled to havethe highlight of our high-voltage installation up and running again."

Astrophysicist Harald Lesch in the Faraday cage

Incidentally, the refitted Faraday cage makes its first major TV appearance on ZDF at 7 p.m. on 7 October. On Harald Lesch's programme "Terra X - Fascination of the Universe, The Big Bang - Puzzle of the Beginning," the well-known astrophysicist, university lecturer and presenter will be getting into the cage himself.

Spectacular experiments in LAPP high-voltage laboratory

The high-voltage installation in the Deutsches Museum is a magnet for spectators, but Schulte-Fischedick refers to another highlight which is actually much older, though it still functions to the most modern standards. In Selb, near Wunsiedel, his company operates a high-voltage laboratory known as the Hochvolthaus. This started work in 1928 and still facilitates spectacular high-voltage experiments - though these are not open to the public. Both corona discharges (sometimes known as St. Elmo's fire) and brilliant brush discharges can be observed here. All this is on a slightly larger scale than the high-voltage installation at the Deutsches Museum: the laboratory can test at 1.3 million volts under dry conditions and in artificial rain, which the lightning generator can produce a massive 2.1 million volts.

Case Studies

Metro lines are currently being built or extended in nearly all of Iran’s major cities. That includes Isfahan, the fifth-largest city in Iran and former capital of Persia.

More

With lush vegetation and an abundance of tropical flowers, the island of Kauai is one of the eight main Hawaiian islands and a unique natural paradise in the middle of the Pacific. Its isolated location is both a blessing and a challenge – particularly for local energy supplier KUIC.

More

The new power transformers from AVU Netz GmbH are universal in their application. This network operator in western Germany is already implementing three connection versions using identically constructed transformers and thus remaining flexible for future demands. This is made possible by the versatile CONNEX connection system.

 

More

Ankara to Istanbul in just three and a half hours? The new high-speed rail link using specialist technology by PFISTERER transports passengers to the global hub at high speed – even over tricky terrain.

More

An aesthetic appearance: To meet this criterion for overhead lines in Denmark, PFISTERER developed four-meter-long composite insulators for truly beautiful energy.

More

Space-saving, innovative, underground. The Oerlikon substation uses intelligent, vertical connection technology by PFISTERER to free up building space.

More

PFISTERER donates new insulators to Deutsches Museum for high-voltage Faraday cage attraction

LAPP Insulators, a member of the PFISTERER Group of companies, has equipped the famous Faraday cage at the Deutsches Museum in Munich with brand-new insulators. Among the first visitors after the refit were the television channel ZDF with the astrophysicist, presenter and university lecturer, Professor Harald Lesch.

Read more

Anyone who has been to the Deutsches Museum will be familiar with its high-voltage exhibit. The Faraday cage demonstration attracts around 200,000 visitors every year and is far and away the most popular demonstration at the Museum - an unforgettable experience for everyone who sees it. Bolts of lightning flash across the hall with a reverberating 'crack.' Three times daily, a member of the Museum staff climbs into the Faraday cage to prove that a metal cage can protect against electricity levels as high as 220,000 volts.

The high-voltage installation dates from the 1950s: the insulators of the Faraday cage had been in use for as long as 66 years, with the cage and museum employee hanging from them. The thousand-dollar question was: how long do such insulators actually last? An expert from the product testing service TÜV, who was to have assessed the installation recently, was unable to offer any conclusions on this point. Determined to exclude any risk, no matter how small, the Deutsches Museum experts therefore decided to replace the insulators. But where can you get hold of such specialised spare parts quickly? The Museum was naturally eager to avoid a long-term shutdown of its highlight.

Insulators sourced from Wunsiedel again - 66 years on

The original manufacturer of the insulators for the Faraday cage was Stemag, a company based in Wunsiedel, in Upper Franconia and a forerunner of the present-day LAPP Insulators GmbH. The company is still headquartered in Wunsiedel and retains its world-leading position as a manufacturer of insulators, just as it was all those years ago.

Once again, LAPP specialists produced the desired insulators and presented them to the Museum free of charge. "It's a real honour for us to be represented in the Deutsches Museum through our products," explains Jan Schulte-Fischedick, Head of Technical Consulting at LAPP Insulators. Deutsches Museum press spokesman Gerrit Faust adds, "We're absolutely thrilled to havethe highlight of our high-voltage installation up and running again."

Astrophysicist Harald Lesch in the Faraday cage

Incidentally, the refitted Faraday cage makes its first major TV appearance on ZDF at 7 p.m. on 7 October. On Harald Lesch's programme "Terra X - Fascination of the Universe, The Big Bang - Puzzle of the Beginning," the well-known astrophysicist, university lecturer and presenter will be getting into the cage himself.

Spectacular experiments in LAPP high-voltage laboratory

The high-voltage installation in the Deutsches Museum is a magnet for spectators, but Schulte-Fischedick refers to another highlight which is actually much older, though it still functions to the most modern standards. In Selb, near Wunsiedel, his company operates a high-voltage laboratory known as the Hochvolthaus. This started work in 1928 and still facilitates spectacular high-voltage experiments - though these are not open to the public. Both corona discharges (sometimes known as St. Elmo's fire) and brilliant brush discharges can be observed here. All this is on a slightly larger scale than the high-voltage installation at the Deutsches Museum: the laboratory can test at 1.3 million volts under dry conditions and in artificial rain, which the lightning generator can produce a massive 2.1 million volts.

Products

Connection and contacting technology for single-strand insulated power cables.

More

Voltage detector with increased safety

More

Non-contact high voltage detector for use on railway and utility company overhead power lines

More

The universal connection system for cables, transformers, and GIS

More

A full portfolio for all extra high voltage cables

More

Top-class technology from the inventor of the inner cone system

More

A good connection guaranteed for high-voltage cables

More

An extensive range of dry terminations for high-voltage cables

More

The hybrid power generation system: regenerative energy sources with 100% availability and up to 1.000 kW output

More

The plug-in high current connection for trains, wind power plants and industrial applications

More

The compact tensioning system for electric railway overhead lines

More

Unique connectors with stepless shear bolts

More

A safe and simple cable connection for transformers

More

4-cable branches with just a single screw connection

More

The world's largest range of plug-in and built-in cable fittings.

More

A wide range of plug-in connections for all applications and high-performance screw connectors.

More

Reliable and durable contacts – With compression or screw-based connections

More

Together with our subsidiary LAPP Insulators, PFISTERER is your experienced global systems partner for insulators and insulator strings up to 1.000 kV

More

Contact line components – Innovative solutions for electric railway networks

More

State-of-the-art protection – Everything you need from a single source.

More

Turn-Key Cable Systems from the Specialist

More

Achieving Success with Expert Knowledge and Experience

More

Installed Safely and Reliably – By the Expert

More